Ring-tailed Lemurs

The highly social species lives in groups, or troops, of up to 30 individuals. On St. Catherines Island the population subdivided into six troops. Females are dominant in troops. The ring-tailed lemur reproduces readily in captivity, and also in this free- ranging population. Eighty-three ring-tailed lemurs inhabit St. Catherines Island (as of 18 February 2013).

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White-Tailed Deer

The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is a commonly observed mammal on St. Catherines Island. This species occupies a wide variety of habitats, and benefits from a mosaic of wetlands, forests, fields and early successional habitats.

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Nine-Banded Armadillos

The nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) recently arrived on St. Catherines Island. The species was first seen on the Island a decade ago, but has become more evident in the last three years.

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Northern Raccoons

Northern Raccoons (Procyon lotor), a native species, widely inhabit North America. They occur in many different types of habitats, but remain most abundant in areas near water, including bottomland hardwood forests, hardwood swamps, and marshes.

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Wild Hogs

Wild hogs (Sus scrofa), a non-native species in North America, cause extensive damage to ecological systems and human infrastructure. Their aggressive rooting degrades habitat.

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